Wassee Zayin in Zumerset Dialect? (9 November to 16 November)

This week we thought we would take a break from sharing events after all the excitement of fireworks and horror movies to find and share some of our faviourate examples of Somerset dialect in culture.

King Lear by William Shakespere

In the tragic play written in 1605 Shakespere writes one of the personas of Edgar in a Somerset dialect. “Chill not let go, zir, without vurther ‘cagion.”

The Guest, a Drama of the Monmouth’s Rebellion in the Dialect of Somerset by J.A. Garton.

A play written in 1932 that is entirely in Somerset Dialect. “Pretty fair, zur, thank ‘ee, mussen grumble’s no.”

Lorna Doone by R.D. Blackmore.

A romance of Exmoor, this classic novel written in 1869 and set in the late 17th century is an epic tale of feuding families and dramatic landscapes. “Hot mootton pasty for twoo trav’lers, at number vaive, in vaive minnits!”

Adge Cutler and the Wurzels

The Somerset hit makers took Top of the Pops by storm with the songs full of Somerset dialect. “Don’t Tell I, Tell Ee”.

The Sorcerer, Gilbert and Sullivan

The comic-opera kings Gilbert and Sullivan set their third collaboration in a fictional Somerset village called Ploverleigh. “Eh, but oi du loike you!”

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